Sleeping problems are linked to musculoskeletal pain in boys

  • Andreucci A & al.
  • Eur J Pediatr
  • 12.05.2020

  • von Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Boys with sleeping problems were significantly more likely to develop musculoskeletal pain, including persistent pain.

Why this matters

  • Researchers have reported an association between sleep problems and an increased risk for musculoskeletal pain in adults, but studies in children have yielded mixed results.

Study design

  • 1194 children aged 8-9 years (542 boys; 642 girls) from the prospective longitudinal Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study.
  • 1-year follow-up.
  • Funding: Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council; others.

Key results

  • 60% of children had any musculoskeletal pain at baseline and 43% at follow-up.
  • Persistent pain was reported in 15% of children at baseline and 7% at follow-up.
  • At baseline, sleeping problems occurred "often" in 53% of girls and 33% of boys and "almost always" in 47% of girls and 67% of boys.
  • Boys with sleep problems at baseline had a significantly increased risk for:
    • Musculoskeletal pain onset: aOR, 2.80 (1.39-5.62).
    • Persistent musculoskeletal pain: aOR, 3.70 (1.30-10.54) at follow-up.
  • No association was found between sleeping problems and pain in girls.

Limitations

  • Secondary data analysis of a cohort not specifically designed to study link between sleep problems and musculoskeletal pain.