Lung cancer: BMI as a predictor of survival

  • Shepshelovich D & al.
  • J Thorac Oncol
  • 01.06.2019

  • von Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Studien – kurz & knapp
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Takeaway

  • Patients with NSCLC who were overweight or obese at diagnosis had better OS, while those who were underweight at diagnosis had worse  survival.
  • Worse OS was found in patients with NSCLC whose BMI decreased between young adulthood and cancer diagnosis, and in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) who were underweight as young adults.

Why this matters

  • NSCLC patients whose BMI decreased between young adulthood and the time of diagnosis had worse OS in subgroups based on age, sex, smoking status, stage, and histology, suggesting it may be a useful prognostic tool.

Study design

  • Pooled analysis of 16 studies with 26,430 NSCLC patients and 2787 SCLC patients from the International Lung Cancer Consortium.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Worse OS in NSCLC patients who were underweight at diagnosis (aHR, 1.56; P<.001 or whose bmi decreased between young adulthood and diagnosis p the latter was found across age groups sex smoking status stage histology.>
  • Worse OS for SCLC patients who were underweight in young adulthood (aHR, 1.93; P=.001).
  • Better OS for NSCLC patients who were overweight (aHR, 0.89; P<.001 or obese p at diagnosis.>

Limitations

  • BMI was self-reported.