Influenza vaccine: uptake more common in children of vaccinated parents

  • Ding X & al.
  • J Public Health (Oxf)
  • 25.09.2019

  • von Liz Scherer
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • There is a direction association between parental/caregiver influenza vaccination and likelihood for childhood vaccination coverage.

Why this matters

  • Encourage parental/caregiver influenza immunization to promote greater uptake among children.
  • Pediatricians should notify/remind parents/caregivers of influenza vaccine availability at the start of every season, to encourage vaccination.

Key results

  • Included children (based on annual National Health Interview Survey [NHIS]) ranged from 12,486 (2011) to 10,720 (2016).
  • Across years, adult influenza immunization had the greatest association with likelihood for child immunization (pooled result OR, 3.83; 95% CI, 3.39-4.10).
  • ≥3 household members with health insurance, pooled OR, 1.27 (95% CI, 1.02-1.54); 2 members, pooled OR, 1.38 (95% CI 1.15-1.65); 1 member, pooled OR, 1.27 (95% CI, 1.02-1.54) vs no insurance also increased likelihood for child immunization.
  • Both higher education (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.69-0.87) and marital status (i.e. widowed, divorced; OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.72-0.87) negatively affected likelihood for child immunization.

Study design

  • Analysis of NHIS data exploring associations between family characteristics and influenza vaccination coverage among children, 2011-2016.
  • Funding: Kunshan Special Fund for Social Development and Science & Technology.

Limitations

  • Recall bias.
  • Missing confounders.