Do ARBs and ACE-inhibitors confer different suicide risk?


  • Heather Mason
  • Univadis Medical News
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A nested case-control study about different suicide risk and exposure to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) could not identify differences in suicide risk among recipients of the two drug classes in a population of US military veterans, according to an article published in JAMA Network Open.

The analysis, designed to replicate the findings of previous research in a population at higher risk of suicide, included 1,309 suicide victims and 5,217 controls matched by age, sex, and hypertension and diabetes diagnoses. Both decedents and controls had an active prescription for ARBs or ACEIs in the 100 days preceding suicide or death of the matched case.

ARBs were received by 20.2 per cent of controls and 19.6 per cent of cases, while ACEIs were received by 79.8 per cent of controls and 80.4 per cent of cases. The crude suicide odds ratio for ARBs versus ACEIs was 0.966, and 0.985 after controlling for covariates.

These findings reveal that in the population studied, there was no association between ARB vs ACEI use and suicide risk, thus not replicating the findings of a previous study.

This conclusion may encourage the development of replication infrastructures that have the capacity to efficiently and effectively replicate suicide literature.